Idaho priest's home gets exorcism following child porn arrest

Idaho priest’s home gets exorcism following child porn arrest

Idaho priest’s home gets exorcism following child porn arrest

This is a scene from the documentary "The Devil and Father Amorth." Pauline Father Gabriele Amorth, who was chief exorcist of the Diocese of Rome, is the main subject of the documentary. (Credit: CNS)

A retired priest's home has been exorcised and sold, following his arrests for child pornography and drug possession.

NEW YORK — An Idaho priest has been evicted from his home while he awaits trial for possession of child pornography — but the Diocese of Boise has wasted no time in having an exorcist, along with a ten-person prayer team, pray over his former house and selling it off.

Father Thomas Faucher was charged in February with a total of 24 crimes, including 21 counts of felony sexual exploitation of a child, 1 count of felony possession of a controlled substance (LSD) and two counts of misdemeanor possession of a controlled substance (marijuana and ecstasy).

Faucher, who is 72 years old, now waits trial, after a judge set his bail for $1 million dollars.

Meanwhile, the diocese has sold the two-bedroom, two-bathroom house for around $250,000 after giving it a full spiritual cleansing. Faucher lived in the home for 15 years and was served an eviction notice one week after charges against him were issued.

In an interview with the Idaho Statesman, Father John Worster said the property was “filthy,” adding it was necessary to improve the physical and spiritual conditions of the place before putting it on the market.

Bishop Peter Christensen of Boise approved both the exorcism and the selling of the property.

According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, “When the Church asks publicly and authoritatively in the name of Jesus Christ that a person or object be protected against the power of the Evil One and withdrawn from his dominion, it is called exorcism.”

The rite, which is not a sacrament, can be performed by any ordained priest, but requires the permission of a bishop.

Following Faucher’s arrest, the diocese issued a statement describing the allegations against the priest as “deeply disturbing.”

“If these allegations are true and proven in court, they are a betrayal of the trust we place in all ministers such as Father Faucher. Anyone who takes advantage of and exploits children for their own gratification is absolutely wrong. There are no excuses for such behavior by any one of our clergy,” Christensen said.

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