UK prime minister calls for solidarity with persecuted Christians

UK prime minister calls for solidarity with persecuted Christians

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks during a debate in the House of Commons in London, Friday Dec. 20, 2019. (Credit: House of Commons via AP.)

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has made a call of solidarity with persecuted Christians around the world during a Christmas video released on Dec. 24.

LEICESTER, United Kingdom – British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has made a call of solidarity with persecuted Christians around the world during a Christmas video released on Dec. 24.

“Today of all days, I want us to remember those Christians around the world who are facing persecution. For them, Christmas Day will be marked in private, in secret, perhaps even in a prison cell,” Johnson said.

“As Prime Minister, that’s something I want to change. We stand with Christians everywhere, in solidarity, and will defend your right to practice your faith,” he continued.

In December 2018, the UK Foreign Office called for an independent inquiry of international Christian persecution, which was released over the summer.

Johnson is the second high-ranking member of the British establishment to make an appeal for persecuted Christians in the days leading up to Christmas.

On Dec. 18, Prince Charles denounced this year’s Easter attack on churches in Sri Lanka as “an assault on religious freedom everywhere.”

The bombings by an Islamic State-affiliated group killed over 250 people, and injured over 500 others.

The prince was speaking at an Advent service at the Emmanuel Christian Fellowship in east London, whose membership is predominantly ethnic Tamil, the second largest ethnic group in Sri Lanka.

“There are no words that can heal the wounds that you and your fellow Christians have endured, but I did so want you all to know just how much I, and so many people in this country, mind about what you’ve suffered and how much we have been thinking of you all,” Charles said.

“The attacks at Saint Anthony’s Shrine, Colombo, Saint Sebastian’s Church, Negombo and the Zion Church, Batticaloa, were an assault on religious freedom everywhere and against all of us who prize tolerance over division, and love over hate,” he continued.

The Prince of Wales has been a long-time advocate for persecuted Christians, and has often spoken about the issue in the build-up to Christmas.

Follow Charles Collins on Twitter: @CharlesinRome


Crux is dedicated to smart, wired and independent reporting on the Vatican and worldwide Catholic Church. That kind of reporting doesn’t come cheap, and we need your support. You can help Crux by giving a small amount monthly, or with a onetime gift. Please remember, Crux is a for-profit organization, so contributions are not tax-deductible.

Latest Stories