Liverpool archdiocese helps buy protective gear for medical staff

Liverpool archdiocese helps buy protective gear for medical staff

Staff from the Royal Liverpool University Hospital join in a national applause to salute local heroes during the nationwide Clap for Carers NHS initiative to applaud workers fighting the coronavirus pandemic, Thursday, April 2, 2020, in Liverpool, England. (Credit: Peter Byrne/PA via AP.)

The Archdiocese of Liverpool has given £20,000 [$24,500] to help pay for personal protective equipment for Britain’s National Health Service.

LEICESTER, United Kingdom – The Archdiocese of Liverpool has given £20,000 [$24,500] to help pay for personal protective equipment for Britain’s National Health Service.

The donation was made through the Masks4NHSHeroes campaign on Crowdfounder, which has already raised over $1.6 million.

Hospital staff have complained about the lack of protective equipment as the nation faces a surge of cases of COVID-19, with many doctors and nurses resorting to making their own makeshift masks and medical clothing.

Liverpool Archbishop Malcolm McMahon said the donation will “support the medical staff who are, with bravery and selflessness, on the frontline for all of us.”

“I think we are challenged at this time, to think how we as a Church can put our words into action,” he said in a video message.

Catholic churches and other places of worship have been closed throughout the United Kingdom since Prime Minister Boris Johnson ordered a lockdown on March 24 in an effort to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

“Our normal ways of operating and contributing, inspired by our faith, by having our churches open to the whole community, by worshipping and praying, by the immense contribution of our parish volunteers – have been stopped, or at least severely restricted, by the need to stay at home and avoid travel where possible,” the archbishop said.

“We are all desperate to play our part. I am also very conscious that one of the charitable objectives of our own archdiocese is the cure or alleviation of sickness or disease,” McMahon explained.

According to the latest government figures released on Friday, 38,168 people have been confirmed to have COVID-19 in the United Kingdom, of which 3.605 have died.

Follow Charles Collins on Twitter: @CharlesinRome

Latest Stories